ARTICHO

capitalization

lowercase vs. uppercase

IntroductionStyle guideCleaningFormattingToolboxSharingAbout us

The Capitalization function ensures that words are capitalized according to the rules of the style guide. A list of words, each designated a specific capitalization style, is included with Articho. To view the list, go to Style Guide—>Capitalization, and click on Details.

To change a capitalization style for a word, select that word and click on Modify.

To add a new word and assign a capitalization style to it, go to Style Guide—>Capitalization—>Details, and click on Add

           

When modifying or adding a word, you also assign a stylistic category to it, which helps to identify the correct capitalization style for the word. For example, if adding “Labor Day”, then choose the stylistic rule “Names of public holidays”.

  

Absolute rule and relative rule

Each existing word and each new word being added to the capitalization style guide is designated an absolute or relative capitalization rule.

An absolute rule is one where the word is always capitalized a certain way. For example, “World War II” or  “Bronze Age” are always written with the first letter of each word capitalized. For a word designated an absolute capitalization rule, Articho stops on all instances of the word that do not follow the absolute rule and suggests the correct format, with a few exceptions, such as when a word that is set to be all lowercase begins a sentence and thus has an initial capital.

When Articho encounters an expression with an absolute capitalization rule, it memorizes the location of the expression and does not stop on any words within this expression during another search. For example, if the capitalization style “executive committee” is set as an absolute rule, then Articho will not stop on this expression during a capitalization search of just “executive” or “committee”.

A relative rule is one where the capitalization style depends on the context. For example, when using the term Dalai Lama as a pronoun to refer to the individual who holds this position, the term is always written with the first letter of each word capitalized. But when referring to just the position, as in “the previous dalai lama”, the word is lowercased.

For a word designated a relative capitalization rule, Articho stops on all instances of the word and asks whether to keep the current capitalization style or to modify it, with a few exceptions, such as when a word begins a sentence.

NOTE: When searching for a relative rule, the “Correct all” button is not available, because the decision whether or not capitalize the word will depend on each specific context in which the word appears. 

Guidance

Click the More button to consult the capitalization rule.

Correct phrases

When Articho encounters a correctly capitalized expression, it memorizes the location of the expression and does not stop on any words within this expression during another search. For example, if the capitalization style “executive committee” is set as an absolute rule, then Articho will not stop on this expression during a capitalization search of just “executive” or “committee”.

Style guide in detail:

Spacing rules: punctuations, non-breaking spaces and unwanted spaces
Composition of numbers
Composition in italic/roman
– Capitalization
Miscellaneous rules : quotation marks, dashes, location of note calls, frequent errors…
Paired punctuation marks
Consult the style guide

Download trial version

Fully functional and free 30 days